Words – Juxtapose – How I made the design

Here I shall show how I made the design for the word ‘juxtapose’. First of all I should say this post is rather detailed and very long as I have used many more techniques than I have done for any design before.

Also I wanted to try and make the techniques accessible to everyone who has the programs I use here, as it is so annoying when you start a tutorial and can’t finish it because you don’t understand it, or it wasn’t written properly etc…

Final Design

NB: Because I created this design so quickly, there will also be some elements of the design where the shape and size of objects and the positioning of them is down to the individual and I can’t guide you on how I did it in a suitable manner. If you need a template, using the image of the final design will probably work best to give you a sense of proportion.

The reason why I have presented this as a tutorial is so I can show what I have learnt and can teach others.

Programs Used:

  • Adobe Photoshop CS5.1 (photomontage, photo editing, constructing the design)
  • Adobe Illustrator CS5.1 (creating vector shapes)

Resources Used: (I really did not realise how many I had used until I wrote this…)

Making the Design: First of all I am going to show how I prepared all of the images I used up to the point where they are ready to be placed into the main file. Then I shall show how I created the main file. A note I will add is I am making this to print, show everything will be 300dpi, if you are creating for use on-screen, 72dpi is the recognised standard.

Preparing the wallpaper for use:

  1. Download the wallpaper file from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  3. Select the Crop Tool from the Tools Panel, and then draw a box over the rough area you want to crop to. Choose an area where the lighting is even, I’ve chosen somewhere near the top in the centre. Zoom in to 3200%, so you can place the boundary of the cropping to individual pixels. This makes for a reliable pattern that can be repeated. Press Enter to confirm the crop.Cropping wallpaper
  4. To edit the image, firstly I went to Image > Hue/Saturation, slid the Hue slider to -180, to change to a nice green colour similar to what I had before with the old wallpaper. Slide the Saturation slider to -50 to fade the colour back. Finally I slid the Lightness slider to -20, in order for a slightly darker pattern.
  5. Then to edit it further I went to Image > Brightness/Contrast, slid the Brightness slider to 100 in order to reduce the level of green in the background, and slid the Contrast slider to -20 in order to fade the pattern into the background more. Wallpaper pattern
  6. I then saved the file as a .psd. The selection is now ready to be used in the main file when required.

Preparing the Moon Globe for use:

  1. Download the moon globe file from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  3. We need to remove the white background in order to place the moon globe into the main file. To do this I selected the Magic Wand from the Tools Panel, and clicked in the an area where there was lots of white to make a selection. This will only cover a section of what we need, so to add to this, hold down the shift key and click in an area. You will need to repeat this process several times until you are happy with it. Should you need to remove an area you selected mistakenly, press the option/alt key while clicking. To deselect everything, go to Select > Deselect (cmd/ctrl d keyboard shortcut)
  4. Now we can see the background is selected, but we want the globe selected. So we want to invert the selection, which can be achieved by going to Select > InverseMagic Wand selectionMagic Wand selection inverted
  5. The selection is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Preparing the space hopper for use:

  1. Download the space hopper file from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  3. To remove the white background select the Magic Wand from the Tools Panel, and click in a white area. To add to this, hold down the shift key and click in an area. To remove an area, press the option/alt key while clicking.
  4. To invert the selection, go to Select > Inverse.Space hopper selected
  5. The selection is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Preparing the carpet texture for use:

  1. Download the carpet file from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  3. Select the Rectangular Marquee Tool from the Tools Panel and draw a selection across the whole width of the image, and about a third of the way down.
  4. Then I went to Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation as I do not want a grey carpet particularly as it will clash with what will be outside the door. So I slid the Hue slider to -180 and then because it looked too dull, the Saturation slider to +50. I did experiment with the Vibrancy to make the colour stronger but found I lost some lighter tones in the carpet so did not use this in the end. Carpet selection
  5. The selection is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Preparing the wood texture for the desk drawers:

  1. Download the wood textures for the desk drawers from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. The resource should already have the resolution set at 300dpi but personally it was the wrong way for me, so I went to Image > Image Rotation > 90° CW.
  3. Depending on how the designing goes, you may want to leave this step until you have established the main proportions of your design. Select the Rectangular Marquee Tool from the Tools Panel and draw a selection to the rough size to a typical desk drawer. It is more important to get the proportions right then the size, and you can always re-do this element if you are not happy with it until you are. For me I found it was a lot of trial and error. Selecting wood texture for drawers
  4. The selection is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Preparing the wood texture for the door and desk top:

  1. Download the wood textures for the door and desk top from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  3. Depending on how the designing goes, you may want to leave this step until you have established the main proportions of your design. Select the Pen Tool from the Tools Panel and draw a shape to the rough size of a desk top, making sure the wood grain runs in a way you are happy with. For me I found it was a lot of trial and error to get a shape that was suitable.
  4. When you have created this shape, to make it into a selection go to the Layers Palette, and at the top click on the sub-palette named ‘Paths‘. For the relevant path, right click and select Make SelectionWood selection
  5. The selection is now ready to be copied into the main file when required. Deselect the selection (Select > Deselect) once it is imported into the main file and repeat this process for the door.

Preparing the eye for use:

  1. Download the eye file from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  3. Then it is a case of selecting eye so it can be copied into the main file. To do this I used the Elliptical Marquee Tool, available from the Tools Panel. (You most likely will need to click and hold down the Rectangular Marquee Tool to bring up a drop-down list with other options on it) For a perfect circle, hold down the shift key while you draw the selection as it keeps the selection in proportion and if you want to move the selection while you are creating it, hold down the space key as well. You can see here I have chosen to make a small selection, cutting off some of the outer iris in order to avoid skin being part of the selection. Eye selection
  4. The selection is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Preparing the phonebox for use:

  1. Download the phonebox file from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. To use the phonebox and to select it from the background easier, I chose to crop the image first. To do this I selected the Crop Tool from the Tools Panel, and drew the box over the image as can be seen below: Phonebox crop
  3. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  4. To remove the white background select the Magic Wand from the Tools Panel, and click in a white area. To add to this, hold down the shift key and click in an area. To remove an area, press the option/alt key while clicking.
  5. To invert the selection, go to Select > Inverse.
  6. The selection is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Preparing the Moon landing image:

  1. Download the Moon landing image from here. Open it in Photoshop. (File > Open)
  2. Go to Image > Image Size and in the resulting dialog box, change Resolution to 300dpi so it is of a high enough quality for printing.
  3. Save the image (File > Save), it is now ready to be placed into the main file when required.

Creating the vector shapes: This is the result of all the vector shapes I made to give me a template as to how to create this design. I will now show how I made the relevant vector shapes to a point where they are ready to be placed into the main file. I have used Illustrator CS5 for this as it is better suited to making vector shapes than Photoshop.

Vector design template

Creating the door frame and skirting board:

  1. Ensure the Fill box at the base of the Tools Panel is set to white using the Color Picker (CMYK 0,0,0,0) and the Stroke is off. An adjustment I made later on was to set the colour to CMYK 0,0,0,10. You can either fix that here, or it can be changed later on, which I will explain at the relevant point.
  2. Select the Rectangle Tool from the Tools Panel and draw a rectangle to the size you want. Then draw another one on top, but leave an equal sized border on the top and two sides but not for the base.
  3. Make the Pathfinder palette visible by going to Window > Pathfinder. Making sure both shapes are selected using the Selection Tool from the Tools Panel, click on the Exclude option, which will remove the second shape leaving the outline you need for the door frame.
  4. I have combined this with the skirting board for the room, by selecting the Rectangle Tool again, and drawing that to meet the base of the door frame, before selecting the door frame and skirting board and going to Object > Group. (Cmd/Ctrl + G keyboard shortcut) Vector door frame
  5. The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Creating the ‘iMac’ computer/keyboard/mouse:

  1. I’ve started with the computer and it will be based on an iMac, so first of all I selected the Rounded Rectangle Tool, and drew out a shape to be the size of the unit. I changed the colour to a light grey using the Color Picker, accessed through the Fill box near the base of the Tools Panel.
  2. I then have drawn another shape, this time I want it to be coloured the darkest possible black equivalent to an RGB black (CMYK 75,68,67,90) and leave a small border around the top and side edges with more in the middle. Mac screen
  3. Then I made the base. For this I used the Pen Tool and drew the shape you can see below, and changed the colour to the same light grey as that for the screen. Then I selected the Rectangle Tool and drew a small dark grey shape to go at the bottom of the base to add depth. I then grouped the base and screen together by selecting them using the Selection Tool and going to Object > Group (Cmd/Ctrl + G keyboard shortcut)Base for imac
  4. Then I created the keyboard. I selected the Rounded Rectangle Tool, and drew a shape to fit the shape of a keyboard. However, to make it appear in perspective, I needed to distort the shape. This was achieved by going to Effect > Distort & Transform > Free Distort… where it brings up a box where you can click and drag the shape’s edges to reshape it. Free Distort
  5. To make it look three dimensional I made a copy of the shape, changed the colour to dark grey, and positioned it just a bit lower than the first keyboard shape. To put it behind that, I went to Object > Arrange > Send Backward. This left a gap at either end that needed to be filled because of the rounded edges. Therefore I used the Rectangle Tool to create a shape that could fill this gap and produce the result below. I then grouped the keyboard elements together by selecting them using the Selection Tool and going to Object > Group (Cmd/Ctrl + G keyboard shortcut)Keyboard vector
  6. I then moved onto the mouse. I selected the Pen Tool and drew a shape reminiscent of the Apple Magic Mouse, making sure the colour was a light grey. Then I made a smaller shape using the Pen Tool to add some depth to the shape. I then grouped the two elements together by selecting them using the Selection Tool and going to Object > Group (Cmd/Ctrl + G keyboard shortcut)Vector mouseComputer vector set
  7. The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Creating the clock:

  1. I selected the Rounded Rectangle Tool, and drew three shapes, one light grey, one dark grey and one black to form the main clock structure.
  2. I then added another rounded rectangle to the base to form the stand for the clock. Vector clock frame
  3. To finish off the clock I needed some digital figures. To do this I used the Pen Tool to create one of the shapes, which I coloured in a bright green (CMYK 60,0,86,0) to match that found on some digital clocks. I then copied and pasted that shape to have as many as I needed, and rotated the ones that needed to be vertical rather than horizontal by going to Object > Transform > Rotate and entering 90° for each one. Then to add in the time separator I made two squares using the Rectangle Tool, pressing shift while forming them to keep them in proportion, then selected each square and went to Object > Transform > Rotate and entered 45° for each one. Clock vector
  4. I then grouped all the objects by selecting them using the Selection Tool, and going to Object > Group. (Cmd/Ctrl + G)The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Creating the mug:

  1. To form the main part of the mug, I selected the Ellipse Tool and drew two ovals, one above the other with a gap in-between. The top oval should be a dark grey, the bottom oval a light grey. Then I drew another oval over the top, dark grey one and coloured it to be a bright orange. Then I selected the Rectangle Tool and drew a rectangle to fill the gap in-between. Vector mug base
  2. Then I needed to add a handle. So I drew a oval that is light grey, and another one inside that. Then I opened up the Pathfinder palette (Window > Pathfinder) and with both shapes selected using the Selection Tool, I clicked the Minus Front option. I then positioned it over the mug.
  3. Finally I wanted to add some steam. To do this I used the Pen Tool to draw a curvy shape, and made sure the colour was white. Then I lowered the Opacity, which can be found on the Control Bar to 50%. Mug vector
  4. I then grouped all the objects by selecting them using the Selection Tool, and going to Object > Group. (Cmd/Ctrl + G)The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Creating the pencil:

  1. First of all I selected the Rectangle Tool and created five shapes as can be seen below to form the body of the pencil.Pencil 1
  2. Then I selected the Pen Tool, and drew a series of shapes to form the top part of the pencil. I made sure the colourings gave a three dimensional effect.Pencil 2
  3. Then I added some pale yellow rectangles using the Rectangle Tool to the central black stripe, to symbolize the markings you would expect to see on a pencil.Pencil 3
  4. I then added a red cap to the end using the Pen Tool. To do this I clicked at one end to form a start point, click at the other end and dragged the handle into a place where the curved that was formed was equal.Finished pencil

Creating the pen:

  1. First of all I selected the Rectangle Tool in order to make the shapes you see below with the appropriate colour scheme to resemble the body of a pen.Pen 1
  2. Then I selected the Pen Tool and added the writing end of the pen including the nib, which I coloured slightly lighter than the rest of the pen to be more realistic.Pen 2
  3. Then still using the Pen Tool, I added on the main part of the lid, before adding the clip to the lid.Pen 4
  4. I then grouped all the objects by selecting them using the Selection Tool, and going to Object > Group. (Cmd/Ctrl + G)The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Creating the paper:

  1. I selected the Pen Tool, and drew a parallelogram out on-screen.
  2. I then made sure the colour was a light cream, to give it a slightly older feel than a crisp white sheet of paper would. Vector paper
  3. The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Creating the lamp base:

  1. I started by using the Ellipse Tool to create the top of the base which I filled as a light shade of grey. Then I copied the shape and lowered it, changing the colour to a darker grey. This left a gap, so I selected the Rectangle Tool and created a shape to fill the gap.Lamp base
  2. To create a sense of perspective I used the Rectangle Tool to create three rectangles. Then I used the Free Distort tool (Effect > Distort & Transform > Free Distort…) to change the shape slightly. Then I selected the Ellipse Tool and created three circles of varying sizes, pressing the shift key while creating them to keep them in proportion, and placed them in-between the rectangles forming the stem of the lamp as if they were joints.Lamp base and stem
  3. The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

Creating the desk:

  1. I started making the desk as a whole unit, knowing that while some elements would be replaced by images of textures, I can use the vector shapes as a template while I was still creating and finalising this idea. So the front part of the desk was created out a set of rectangles, so obviously I used the Rectangle ToolDesk front
  2. Then I drew another rectangle for the desk top, and used the Free Distort tool (Effect > Distort & Transform > Free Distort…) to add a sense of perspective.Desk vector
  3. The object is now ready to be copied into the main file when required.

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Creating the main file:

Step 1: Open a new Photoshop document with these settings:New Document

Step 2: With the wallpaper file open, select the Move Tool from the Tools Panel, and drag it into the main file and drop it into the top left corner.

Step 3: Press the Command/Ctrl + T keyboard shortcut in order to re-size the image to what you feel is suitable. Remember increasing the size will lower the quality.

Step 4: From there, with the wallpaper layer selected, press and hold the option/alt key, on the keyboard and drag it across to the right and line it up. Repeat this process until you have a full horizontal axis of wallpaper.

Step 5: Select the top layer in the Layers Palette (Windows > Layers if it is not already visible) and then scroll down and then while holding the shift key on the keyboard, select the ‘Wallpaper’ layer to select everything in between. Then right click and select Merge Layers from the resulting drop-down list.

Step 6: Repeat steps 4 and 5 to fill the vertical axis with wallpaper and merge them together to get the result you see below:

Wallpaper for design

Step 7: From the Illustrator file where I created the vector shapes I copied the door frame and skirting board (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into Photoshop (Cmd/Ctrl + V). When the dialog box appears asking how you would like it to be pasted, I recommend selecting Smart Object, as that allows for editing choices later on if you wish.

With regards to the adjustment I made for this design, I was able to change the colour by clicking twice on the layer in the Layers Palette to bring up the Layer Styles menu, where I added a Color Overlay, of which the colour I chose was CMYK 0,0,0,10 to give that very pale grey I was looking for that resembles an off-white.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.21.29

Step 8: I then went to File > Place and inserted the NASA image into the design. I used the Free Transform tool (Cmd/Ctrl + T) to re-size the image to position it correctly.

Of course it was too large to fit in the door frame, so to overcome this, I selected the Rectangular Marquee Tool and drew a selection around the inside edge of the door frame. Then at the bottom of the Layers Palette, there are a row of buttons, of which I clicked on the second one from the left Add Layer Mask. This hides the part of the image I did not need, and can be adjusted if required later on should you wish to change it.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.21.45

Step 9: Next I wanted to add the door in. So I copied the door (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into the main file, (Cmd/Ctrl + V) selecting Smart Object in the Paste Options dialog box. I used the Free Transform tool (Cmd/Ctrl + T) to re-size the image to position it correctly.

Then I changed the Foreground Color to a dark brown, selected the Rectangle Tool and added a thin strip down the edge of the door to add some visual depth to it.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.23.19

Step 10: Next I wanted to add part of the vector desk in. So I copied it (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into the main file, (Cmd/Ctrl + V) selecting Smart Object in the Paste Options dialog box.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.23.34

Step 11: Next I wanted to add part of the vector desk in. So I copied it (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into the main file, (Cmd/Ctrl + V) selecting Smart Object in the Paste Options dialog box.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.24.17

Step 12: Next I added the textured wood images into the design. So I copied them in one at a time (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted them into the main file, (Cmd/Ctrl + V) selecting Smart Object in the Paste Options dialog box.

Now all of the wood textures were in the same place, I selected all of the layers that contained the textured wood (not vector) and went to Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation to adjust them based on feedback I got during the project. The settings I changed were as follows: Saturation: -30 and Lightness: -20.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.24.41

Step 13: I then changed the Foreground Color to a light grey, and selected the Rectangle Tool and added a small edge to the base of the door to add an extra realistic touch to the design.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.24.58

Step 14: Then I added the space hopper in. So I copied (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into the main file, (Cmd/Ctrl + V) selecting Smart Object in the Paste Options dialog box. I used the Free Transform tool (Cmd/Ctrl + T) to re-size the image to position it correctly. Make sure the layer is below the floor and door edge layers.

Because I wanted it to look sunken down in the doorway, as if there is a step outside, it had to be positioned lower and therefore over the floor and door edge. To overcome this, I added a Layer Mask and after pressing the D key as a shortcut to change the Foreground Color to black, selected the Brush Tool (keyboard shortcut B) and right-clicked on screen to bring up the Brush Editor. I chose a hard brush, and altered the size using the keyboard shortcuts of [ + ]. I then brushed over the areas I wanted to be invisible to remove them. This takes a steady hand but because I placed the layer behind the door edge, I did not have to be too neat with the finish.

Then to finish it off, I added an Outer Glow via the Layer Styles menu, which can be accessed by double clicking on the layer in the Layers Palette. The settings are shown below: Outer Glow layer style

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.25.09

Step 15: I then added a set of handles to the desk and to the door. To do this I selected the Rectangle Tool and drew a set of shapes as can be seen below. While for the desk drawers, only the front part is visible, for the handle on the door you can see the attaching parts for the handle. Therefore I made them a slightly different colour to the main handle, being a small bit lighter.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.25.27

Step 16: From the Illustrator file where I created the vector shapes I copied the computer, keyboard and mouse (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into Photoshop (Cmd/Ctrl + V). When the dialog box appears asking how you would like it to be pasted, I recommend selecting Smart Object, as that allows for editing choices later on if you wish.

Then it is just a case of using the Move Tool to position it where you would like.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.25.52

Step 17: As can be seen, I have now placed the Moon landing image into the design. To do this I went to File > Place and selected this image to be placed. As can be seen I have used the Free Transform tool to re-size the image to fit, and added a Layer Mask through a selection by the Rectangular Marquee Tool to clip the image to the screen.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.26.55

Step 18: I decided then to add an element of realism to the design through the phonebox being added to the Moon landing image. I copied (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it in (Cmd/Ctrl + V), and re-sized it using the Free Transform tool.

I then went to Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation and decreased the Saturation to -20 and the Lightness to -10 in order to blend it in better with the design. it still stood out, so I used a small ridge on the Moon to my advantage and decided to place it behind that by a small margin in to make it look authentic. I selected the Brush Tool (keyboard shortcut B), chose a soft brush via the Brush Editor (right-click to access), and brushed the base out, the result of which can be seen in the two images directly below:

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.27.03 Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.27.15

Step 19: After that I decided to place the lamp base in together with the eye selection. From the Illustrator file where I created the vector shapes I copied the lamp base (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into Photoshop (Cmd/Ctrl + V) selecting Smart Object in the Paste Options dialog box as that allows for editing choices later on if you wish. Then I copied in the selection of the eye, using the Free Transform tool to fit it to size.

To merge the edge of the eye in better to the grey on the lamp base I chose to add a Inner Glow via the Layer Styles menu by double clicking on the ‘eye’ layer twice. The settings I entered are below, as well as how it looks in a close-up view.

Inner GlowClose up of inner glow

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.27.46

Step 20: The only other photo that needs adding to the desk is the Moon globe. So I went and copied (Cmd/Ctrl + C) the selection I had made for it and pasted it in (Cmd/Ctrl + V), and re-sized it using the Free Transform tool.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.28.27

Step 21: From the Illustrator file where I created the vector shapes I copied all the other desk objects one at a time (Cmd/Ctrl + C) and pasted it into Photoshop (Cmd/Ctrl + V) selecting Smart Object in the Paste Options dialog box as that allows for editing choices later on if you wish. Then I used the Free Transform tool to fit it to size and specifically for the pen and pencil vector shapes, rotated them so their arrangement on the desk looked more natural.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.28.44

Step 22: After that I copied (Cmd/Ctrl + C) the selection I had made for the picture frame and pasted it in (Cmd/Ctrl + V), and re-sized it using the Free Transform tool.

Then I went to File > Place and selected the old paper texture to be placed into the design. As can be seen I have used the Free Transform tool to re-size the image to fit, and added a Layer Mask through a selection by the Rectangular Marquee Tool to clip the image to the picture frame.

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.29.02

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.29.24

Step 23: The final part of the design is the text. I have chosen to use the Garamond typeface for this, as it adds to the authentic aged appearance of the paper. I could have used a sans-serif ‘modern’ typeface to create a contrast such as Helvetica, but I felt it was unnecessary to the design. To create a visual hierarchy to the piece I set the word juxtapose in the bold weight of Garamond, using the regular weight for the definition.

So I selected the Horizontal Type Tool, and wrote the text out, the settings for which I have placed below:

Juxtapose type settings Definition type settings

Step 24: As you may have noticed from the previous close-ups of the type, it looks a bit faded in sections, which I did to blend it into the paper to add to the realism of the aged feel. To do this I bought up the Layer Styles menu by double-clicking on the type layer, and using the Blend If function, the settings of which can be seen below. To split the highlights section so half can be dragged across the screen, hold the alt/option key while dragging it.Blend If function

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 17.29.44

Final Result:

Final Design

Now you should have a design like the image above! Hopefully this tutorial has been of help, if so how about leaving a comment? Could this tutorial have been better? If so, leave a comment, as long as it constructive.

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